RE-ENTRIES.COM

NUMERAL ISSUE

Re-entries

Five Cents

Half Cent / One Cent / Two Cents / Three Cents

Return to Index                  Return to Listings Page


The first series of twelve 5¢ Numerals shown here were all discovered and submitted by Hugh Laurence.

I recently received a letter and scan from a collector about the stamp seen below as Re-entry #5. It reads as follows: "I am very puzzled by this 5¢ Numeral. It appears to match up with Reiche/Sendbuehler #5.4(1) but I cannot see how this can be a simple re-entry. The pattern in "NA" matches nothing! Or am I going blind?!"

Actually, the same could be said about the odd looking markings in the first 7 or 8 stamps seen below, as well as numerous other stamps in my collection. This is something that puzzled me for some time as well, until I came up with the following reasoning. I would appreciate input from anyone else who may have suggestions about how these lines came to be.

This is what I personally have come up with to explain this type of re-entry markings ... It could well be disputed by an engraver, but it makes sense to me.

In the process of engraving a die, there are areas of design that need to be 'scooped out' fairly deeply (relatively speaking) so that those areas will fill completely with ink and print as solid patches of colour. On the 5c Numeral, these areas would be the background to the words CANADA, POSTAGE, FIVE and CENTS. Depending on the type of tool used, I can see the metal being gouged out in strips with ridges between them. (Think of a melon being scooped out by a melon-baller.) Since these ridges are below the surface level of the plate, the engraver may or may not have taken the time to remove the ridges, since the area would fill with ink anyway and the ink in them would print as a solid area of colour. Now we come to the actual process of laying down the designs or re-entering the plate. If a design is partly rocked into the steel plate in the wrong position and stopped before it is entered to its full depth, these ridges may be impressed into the steel. BUT, since the design was not fully entered to the bottoms of these 'valleys' only the tops of the ridges would be pressed into the steel. When printed, the lines made by these ridges could print as the areas that have us puzzled, for example, the 'ray-like' areas or lines in the middle 'A' of CANADA on the stamp in question. If you look at some of the other 5c Numerals, for example, #1, you will see a similar ray-pattern, but in the upper margin. However, if you look at the marks for awhile, you can imagine them as being part of the oval band of lettering that was misplaced significantly upwards. This is true of the various other 5c re-entries seen here as well.

This is my explanation of what these lines are from; I welcome your input.

A wonderful new resource has become available for collectors of this issue with the publication of Peter Spencer's "BLUE OPALINE: The Exceptional Plate One of the Canada Five Cent Numeral Issue" published by BNAPS, April 2007. The 226 page full-colour opus is absolutely loaded with extreme close-up scans taken by a Proscope Computer Microscope. Almost every position on the plate of 200 (two panes of 100 each) has been plated and can be identified with the use of this book.


NOTE:

**A magnificent Foreign Entry on the 5¢ Numeral has come to light. Click HERE to go to a separate page on this incredible variety.

 

FIVE CENTS BLUE

&

TEN CENTS BROWN VIOLET


*1

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

The Major Re-entry

(Misplaced Entry)

Plate 1, Right Pane

Position #13   (1R13)

See above for explanation of the following re-entries.


*2

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry

Plate 1, Right Pane

Position #20   (1R20)


*3

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry


*4

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry

Plate 1, Right Pane

Position #44   (1R44)


*5

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry

Plate 1, Right Pane

Position #46   (1R46)

^ Plate proof showing misplaced entry from 1R46 (RETrimble Collection)


*6

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry

Plate 1, Right Pane

Position #94   (1R94)


*7

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry


*8

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry  


*9

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry


*10

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry  


*11

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry


*12

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Re-entry  


*13

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Strong Re-entry

Position 1R14

This is a nice re-entry found by David Noss. Notice the mark in the first 'A' of CANADA and the arc and marks in the white oval below 'ANA.'

Courtesy of Dave Noss

Courtesy of Dave Noss


*14

Scott #79

5¢ Blue

Arc

There is an arc to the left of the portrait that appears to have a guide dot at its centre. This is likely part of the plate preparation layout.

^ From the RETrimble Collection ^


 

     
     
     
     
     

 

back to top

 



Return to Index                  Return to Listings Page


Ralph E. Trimble

Specialist in BNA Re-entries
retrimble@rogers.com